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Epsilon 2020 Creative + Coding Summit (Zoom Edition) Guest Speaker

This year, instead of a 2-day in-person event, our team connected over an hour and a half lunch, beginning w/ some company updates, ending w/ breakout small-group discussion sessions in Zoom meeting rooms + in between, were surprised w/ an unconventional + extremely inspirational guest speaker.

Our guest speaker was Jeff Miller, a friend of someone on our team, + a passenger on the July 19, 1989 United Airlines flight 232 from Denver to Chicago, that crash-landed at Sioux City, Iowa’s Gateway Airport after a tail engine explosion + subsequent loss of hydraulic control.

The point of Jeff sharing this story w/ our team specifically at this point in time (mid-pandemic) was to hear a firsthand experience of someone who lived through something intense + traumatic in their life, as well as to hear the key takeaways + what he learned from it.

Ever since hearing this story, I’ve been in a deep YouTube hole, watching tons of videos about it as well as digging up a bunch of articles on the crash, so I’ll share some of those links at the end in case anyone reading this is just as interested as I am!

(side note – my dad is from Iowa, and told me that one of his friends’ father was one of the four pilots on this flight + one of the people who survived – but not the captain shown in the video below)

Jeff begins by telling us there was a really loud explosion at the back of the plane when they were about 40 mins. away from the destination (Chicago), but the plane wasn’t falling out of the sky and no one seemed to be reacting much, so he just went back to reading his book while the flight attendants were collecting lunch trays. Everything seemed fairly normal.

He says then there was an announcement made that they’d be making an emergency landing in Sioux City, Iowa, but he figures ’emergency landing’ was the airline just being precautious due to the explosion, because everything was going as per usual since then. They were also informed they may be instructed to exit the aircraft by sliding down the emergency slide + he was looking forward to getting to use this slide you always see in the emergency instruction videos + pamphlets because how many people get to do that?!

So, he says, the passengers were expecting a hard landing + he was expecting to be slightly delayed from arriving at his destination due to this one additional stop they needed to make. He wasn’t really concerned until the crew yelled out “Brace, brace, brace!” right as they were landing + everyone was told to bend over + grab their ankles.

The plane then stood up on its nose, did a cartwheel, and the wings fell off, the tail fell off, and it slid 1.8 miles down the runway. It finally landed upside-down in a cornfield to the right of the runway. Jeff says no one was panicking, that he saw, at any point – before or after.

At this point, he was still buckled into his seat + was hanging from the ceiling. His white gym shoes were still white, jeans were spotless, hair still looked combed + didn’t have a scratch on him. Only 13 people walked away that day w/ zero injuries.

(In case you’re a nervous flyer like myself, he told us he was sitting in Row 16G.)

The news first reported that everyone was dead. His parents saw the reports that there were no survivors. Right when they were about to relay the news to his wife + children, he called on the phone to tell them he’s alive/what happened (he wasn’t sure if they even knew or had heard anything about it yet).

Jeff was the only person not to sue the airlines. He was probably the only person on the flight to not experience any loss – incredibly, he even got his luggage back. He also added that he wasn’t originally even going to be on this flight + chose it because he knew that a DC-10, which is a wide-body… would have a better lunch. 🤯

“I believe I survived to talk to you about this today.”

He said whenever he is available + can possibly speak about this, he does, because in a brief moment of the crash, when he realized what was happening, he had made a promise to God to tell his story if he survived. He hopes even one person hearing it will be inspired, think about the world differently + change something in their life.

Key takeaways:

“Everyone has a purpose, but it’s up to you to capture it.”

He explains that your destiny very well may be different from what you think it is.

“You become what you think about.”

If you believe things will never be okay, then they won’t be. If you think negative thoughts, you’ll live in negativity.

We are all here at this time for a reason.”

Respond to your current situation/the pandemic in the best way you can.

The Power Of Forgiveness –

Ask for forgiveness. It’s one of the best things you can do for yourself. Free yourself. Let people know you forgive them, even if they don’t ask for it/reach out to you to apologize.

Be Kind –

Be thoughtful. Go the extra mile. We don’t always need to be setting people straight all the time. Smile. Talk to people nicely. And talk to people wherever you go.

“Life isn’t what we think it is.”

Additional material to check out:

Daily Herald

Chicago Tribune

Sioux City Journal

The Gazette

“A Fresh Dose of Perspective” – Carol Stream Chamber

Here the captain speaks about the handful of things that went right the day of the crash – that had to go right – for there to be any survivors.

This Nightline clip gathers a few different perspectives + how their lives were altered by the crash.

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thailand

Article Published on International TEFL Academy’s Official Blog – “The Start of a New Chapter After Thailand”

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Link to this post on ITA’s blog: https://www.internationalteflacademy.com/alumni-stories/the-start-of-a-new-chapter  

By: Courtney Clark 

Hi, I’m Courtney! I took my TEFL certification class in January 2016 and worked part-time for a while to save up money to teach abroad. I finally decided on Thailand as my destination because it was somewhere I always wanted to visit and the timing coincided perfectly with the start of their school semester. I left for Thailand in April 2017 and taught kindergarten until October 2017.

I had 33 students and would teach English, science, math and art lessons each week. All of the students had very unique personalities, which always kept class interesting. Some of my favorite moments include pretending to be zombies and chasing each other around on the playground, dancing to the video “Baby Shark”, and a day where everyone brought in food, and I taught the students how to make sandwiches.

Teaching English in Thailand

From the moment I gave notice that I would be returning to the U.S., I knew it would be incredibly difficult to leave all the people I met there behind. It was so hard to say goodbye to all the friends I had made, my Thai co-teachers who had become like family to me, and my adorable little students. However, I had to leave for my own reasons, which were to be able to grow as a person in new ways and to really get started on my career.

Upon arriving home in the U.S., I immediately noticed so many differences between the lifestyle I had grown accustomed to in Thailand and the one I grew up in but that now felt so foreign to me. I forgot about the “hustle bustle,” busy, rushing lifestyle that is the norm here in the U.S. I also forgot about the importance and stress placed on productivity rather than a peaceful state of mind. I felt unsure about my ability to adapt back into such a stressful environment.

Teaching English in Thailand

Reverse culture shock is a real thing. Whereas everyone in grocery stores in Thailand left me alone, here it felt like I was being bombarded by retail workers about store sales and being forced to remember simple things such as small talk about the weather. Whereas all the signs in Thailand were in Thai, and I learned to disregard them, now everything was bright and distracting in giant English letters. The simplest way I can describe this feeling is “sensory overload.”

However, once I finally got over my jet lag and reverse culture shock, I remembered that this fast paced lifestyle is what has always motivated me and pushed me to be the type of person I am which is constantly trying to improve and grow and learn in new, challenging ways. Although I learned so much about myself, Thai culture, the complexity and responsibility of being a teacher, and will always be overwhelmingly grateful for it all, I feel that I have found another opportunity that is a perfect fit for me at this time.

Teaching English in Thailand

My new opportunity is a position in my field of study. I worked on school newspapers from high school all through college and really enjoyed writing and editing all sorts of different topics. Naturally, I majored in English. During my last year of college, I also completed a book publishing internship. I always thought I would continue along this line of editing/publishing but had trouble finding a job after graduation even with all my prior experience and a writing portfolio. However, once returning from Thailand, I added that experience to my resume and felt like I started to get noticed more and received more responses from jobs I applied to.

After several interviews that didn’t feel like a great fit, I finally landed on a marketing company that was looking for a copy editor. After the first interview, I could tell it would be a very exciting opportunity where I would really be able to test my copy-editing and project manager skills. I am very happy to say that everything worked out, and I am now working in my field and beginning my career. I have a picture of my teachers and students from Thailand on my desk. I am thankful every day for the experience and will never forget all that I have learned and how I got to the place I am today.

Teaching English in Thailand

A lot of people ask me if I would ever teach abroad again and the answer is a giant YES!!! I don’t have any plans to in the near future, but it is a priceless life experience I would absolutely love to try again later in my life. I highly recommend it to everyone I meet.

Sabai sabai  (a common Thai phrase meaning “everything’s good” or “not a care in the world”)

Courtney Clark is 25 from Bloomingdale, IL,with a BA in English from Roosevelt University. She worked as a writer/editor for several years before deciding to teach kindergarten in Thailand.

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thailand

Chamber of Reflection

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It’s nearing the end of my time in Thailand so we are finishing up exams in class and I’m beginning to pack up some of my belongings. I’m also beginning to reflect on the emotional rollercoaster this experience has been.

These last 6 months have been some of the most challenging of my entire life. I’ve been living in a small town where most people speak very little English. This can sometimes turn simple conversations into big, overwhelming interactions. Every act of communication takes more effort, which at first is exhausting but gets easier over time. I was able to understand people better after about a few weeks of getting used to hearing the accent. I also learned which words to use that people will understand, when to just point at things and at times have resorted to Google Translate when necessary.

This being said, I truly believe that Thai people are some of the nicest people on Earth. I have had so many touching experiences where a stranger went out of their way to help me. While having these experiences I’ve been very appreciative and blown away because it’s just not something that could be expected in the U.S. (not that people don’t sometimes show random kindness at home, but the point is this isn’t random, it’s just a natural, usual way of life here). Once while traveling on an island, I fell into this huge hole in a sewer grate. My whole calf went down this grate and the only thing that stopped me from falling further in was my knee. It sounds dramatic and it was scary but I wasn’t too badly injured. However, my knee was bleeding and I wasn’t quite prepared to take care of it. A Thai couple that owned a shop across the street came up to me and gave me tissues and the woman actually applied ointment herself to my wound. I was incredibly grateful that they went out of their way to show me kindness when I needed help. Another example is when my friend and I were on our way home and her motorbike ran out of gas (for the record this wasn’t negligence, the gas gauge is unreliable). We attempted to ask a group of Thai people who owned a food stand where we could go to fill up her bike and they told us to wait. We were a little confused until we saw a man drive off and shortly later arrive back with gas for us. While we did thank him and pay him, I was again astounded by the selflessness of people who don’t even speak the same language.

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The only transportation available is driving a motorbike or taking motorbike taxis or tuk tuks around which are not very cost effective. However, I’ve been forced to rely on these methods a lot since I only drove a motorbike a few times here. It wasn’t something I ever got comfortable with since not only do they drive on the opposite side of the street as at home but there also aren’t really any “rules of the road” and it can be pretty unclear at times who has the right of way. I decided I would rather spend a little bit more money to make sure I get home in one piece.

It’s pretty impossible to keep work and personal life separate, which is something I appreciate a lot at home. I’ve had to learn to be friends with the same people I work with everyday and most of who live in the same apartment complex as me. It’s been an extremely different lifestyle just in that alone from living in Chicago where English is widely spoken and your friends sometimes live in whole different neighborhoods, not to mention the difference in population size.

This has been a positive experience in that I’ve had to really put myself out there to form connections with people I don’t immediately have a ton in common with so I’ve had to get out of my comfort zone not only in living in Thailand but also in making friends. It’s also been a negative experience at times because it feels so alienating to be in a country alone with people you don’t really relate to on a deeper level most of the time. I have questioned everything about my own judgment and myself more in this time than ever in my life. At times I could feel completely confident in everything I’m doing and at other times I could feel utterly torn down and like giving up. This experience has taught me a lot about myself, that’s for sure.

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Speaking of health, I have struggled a lot with my physical health as well as mental health. I have been sick more than half my time here even when taking as many preventative measures as possible. This also affected my mental health because feeling lethargic and sickly doesn’t exactly promote optimism in general. Some of the sinus issues I believe has to do with the air quality as well as the different weather and changes in weather. Some days it is extremely hot and the next day it is cooler, rainy and extremely humid. Another aspect of this was my change in diet, which was pretty unavoidable. Although I did manage to continue to be a pescatarian, many food places are not regulated up to the same health standards as in the U.S. In general, there is a lot more MSG used in a lot of the food and a lot of sugar is added to pretty much any kind of cold beverage except water.

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Finally, the biggest challenge here was unsurprisingly the job itself. I had a little experience teaching English as a foreign language but only to different proficiency level adults. I have never taught children and don’t have kids in my family. I only remember ever holding one baby in my life and that is the son of one of my best friends. (Hi Grieta if you’re reading this!) Even having a conversation with one kid at a time is not something that ever came naturally to me and then I had 33 students in class at once. I felt like I had no idea what I was doing. I had to learn what level they were at, what I’m supposed to teach them and how to get them to improve. Now at the end of this semester I’ve never felt like I’ve understood kids better. I’ve learned how to make them laugh, how to cheer them up when they cry, and how to get and hold their attention. They’ve taught me more than I will probably ever realize but one of the most important things they taught me is how to truly be a kid again (or at least feel like one). They’ve taught me how simple happiness can be and how fleeting every moment is. They’ve brought me so much joy throughout all the stress and times I wasn’t feeling my best. They love unconditionally and show it so simply. I hope to be more like them in certain aspects of my life and remember not to take life so seriously all the time. (I definitely cried my eyes out saying goodbye to these beautiful, happy souls a few days ago).

I don’t know if being a kindergarten teacher is my life calling. In fact this could possibly be the only time I ever do it. But I can say it has definitely been one of my favorite jobs so far.

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Although 6 months may seem like a short time to some people, that is how long I planned to stay from the beginning and it’s fairly unique in that it’s somewhat rare (although definitely possible) to find contracts with a teaching agency abroad for less than one year. It’s a good way to try it out without making a huge commitment. Tourist visas in Thailand last only 30 days although it is possible to get them extended to a maximum of 90 days. I think it’s pretty cool that I got to stay double the time someone just traveling would be able to spend in Thailand.

I’m really happy with the experience I’ve had, with the changes I’ve made in my life and with the person I’ve become. I’ve really grown up a lot here because I’ve had to. I’ve met some incredible people who I will never forget and have learned so much about the world and myself. I am grateful to my parents and everyone else who supported me and feel blessed that I was able to go pursue one of my dreams overseas at 24.

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Now I just have to get through the reverse culture shock of returning to the life that I knew in the U.S. but constant change = life and I feel pretty much ready for anything these days!

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thailand

Local Attractions: Chachoengsao, Thailand

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The Pink Elephant:

The Pink Elephant is located at the Wat Saman Rattanaram Temple in Chachoengsao, Thailand. It is Thailand’s largest reclining Ganesha.

 Here is some info about the interesting legends and history behind it from http://www.thaismile.jp/FotoGallary/ThaiPics/e_ThaiPhoto_Chachoengsao.html

Ganesha:

Ganesha is one of the Hindu deities, the eldest son of the destroyer god, Shiva and his wife, Parvati, has an elephant head and four arms, rides on a mouse. Ganesha is worshipped as the god of wisdom and education and remover of obstacles. In Thailand, Ganesha is called Phra Phikanet – พระพิฆเนศ, or Phra Phikanesuan – พระพิฆเนศวร as well. In Hindu, he is known as one of the five deities; Surya (the Sun God), Vishnu (the preserver), Shiva ( the destroyer), Durga (Goddess of Power) and Ganesha.

The elephant head:

There are some legends about the elephant head.

When Shiva’s wife, Parvati, was taking a bath, she made a boy, “Ganesha”, out of the dirt of her body. She asked her son to protect the entrance of the bathroom. Soon, her husband, “Shiva” came back and was going to enter the bathroom, however, a strange boy, Ganesha, was protecting there and wouldn’t let him in.

Shiva didn’t know the boy was his son and got really mad ! He cut Ganesha’s head off and threw it somewhere far away. Ahhh …

After that, when the mother, Parvati, knew that, she cried and cried. Shiva felt very sorry and dashed out to find the head. In the end, he couldn’t find it but brought back an elephant head that he met first on the way, and made it as Ganesha’s lost head.

One tusk broken:

There are some legends about it as well.

Ganesha was walking at night under the moon but fell and one of his tusk got broken. The moon was watching all of this from the first and laughed and laughed. Ganesha got mad ! and threw the broken tusk at the laughing moon. Since then, the moon has gone through phases.”

(sic)

Thailand’s Tallest Bronze Standing Ganesh

This was absolutely beautiful especially with the nice garden surrounding the area and a walkway that goes around the entire statue so you can view it from every angle. Here is a paper I read about the construction of it that I found really interesting: http://papers.cumincad.org/data/works/att/caadria2012_046.content.pdf 

Mini Murrah Farm

This small farm was extremely cute. They had lots of animals that seemed very happy and well cared for. A few were even allowed to roam freely. It was a really nice way to spend an afternoon. They also have a restaurant where we ordered delicious wood fired pizzas.

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thailand

Last visit to Bangkok

The photos above are from one of my favorite places I’ve been to in Bangkok. It’s called Viva Tapas bar and restaurant. It’s located right off the Nana BTS stop. They do so many different styles of cuisine and everything is equally delicious! I also tried my first oysters here and I was surprised at how much I liked them! Full disclosure: I did have to google what is the correct way to go about eating them because I had no idea.

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I returned to a bar I previously visited my first time in Bangkok back in April which is called Octave Rooftop Bar. Last time it was too late to see much but this time I arrived just in time for the sunset, beautiful view and happy hour!

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The next bar I stopped at was about a 20 minute walk away and is called the Iron Fairies. It is a dimly lit, intimate place with live music. Unfortunately I didn’t manage to save the photo I took of the bartender making our absinthe with fire but I do have this picture of Anna and I enjoying ourselves!

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The last stop for food in Bangkok I made for a friend’s birthday party. It was at Charley Brown’s Mexicana restaurant which I wasn’t a big fan of my first time. I thought the vegetarian taco and quesadilla were very plain and flavorless. Luckily, we were informed straight away that they now had a new chef who is from Mexico City and he created a separate menu of some of his specialty dishes. I ordered a fish taco and eggplant that was layered with a cheesy sauce. This time around I was blown away by the food so I’m glad I gave it a second chance! Oh, and of course we ordered sangria to celebrate!

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thailand

Ko Chang

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This weekend was a long weekend due to Mother’s Day, which in Thailand is on August 12. On Friday we made Mother’s Day cards at school and then Friday evening I embarked on a trip to Ko Chang. It’s a longer journey than I’ve taken by van previously so I split up the trip by staying overnight one night in Chantaburi and then continuing to the Trat ferry pier in the morning. The ferry goes from Trat to the island of Ko Chang. Then a taxi truck took me to Chang Park Resort, which I had booked through booking.com. (Use this referral link for $25 off- https://www.booking.com/s/34_6/cnc93081 )

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Ko Chang was larger and less touristy than Ko Samet. However, perhaps due to the holiday or it being an off-season, a lot of shops and restaurants were closed down. That being said, there were still many worthwhile places open and within walking distance.

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Since I’ve been here around 5 months now, I’ve finally started to become a little bored with Thai food so I indulged in greek salad and pasta to change it up a bit. The cacio de pepe I ordered at an Italian place was TO DIE FOR. It was honestly better than what I had in Rome and it’s a traditional Roman dish. The owner is from Milan and decorated his cozy little restaurant with antique and vintage items for an old-fashioned décor.

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The resort was almost deserted with the exception of a few families. I expected it to be pretty crowded so it was a nice surprise that it was fairly secluded. There were always beach and pool chairs available even during the beautiful sunset. The pool bar wasn’t overpriced either. 120 baht for a cocktail is a great price especially considering you’re right on the beach.

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The resort also had a lot of pets including 4 black cats some of which would always follow you up the stairs and were very friendly. The dogs were friendly as well but kept more to themselves than the cats. My personal rule in Thailand is to only pet animals with a collar and even then approach quite slowly so as to not startle them. There are a lot of strays everywhere since they don’t neuter them here.

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thailand

Ko Samet

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I have been very fortunate with the amount of paid holidays this semester since we had another 3 day weekend July 28-30. This time I visited a small island that took about 5 hours to get to by van and ferry. Ko Samet is a very small island that can be either very expensive or fairly affordable depending how you travel. For example, the ferry took about 20 minutes and had a pretty view but they also offered a speedboat option, which cost double the price of the ferry. They had a 20 baht entry fee for everyone just to enter the pier (but 20 baht is less than $1 USD so it’s not a big deal).

It was extremely crowded since it was a holiday weekend so I definitely saved a lot of money by booking a place to stay ahead of time. The hostel I stayed at was called Samed Thanee. They were the cheapest option I could find with wifi and AC included. It was very nice and clean but on the opposite side of the island from the good beaches, however you can drive there on a rental scooter easily in 10 minutes or less. The plus side of this location was that it was very quiet at night since it was pretty far away from all the touristy bars and party hostels.

There were also lots of food choices for about 150 baht on average but I managed to find meals for 60 baht since this was the end of the month and I had a very low budget. I also went to the beach early enough in the day that I didn’t have to pay the 200 baht they normally charge foreigners since the good beaches are located inside a national park.

The first beach I went to was called Ao Prao and it was fairly empty which was surprising considering that there are resorts located directly on the road on this beach. There were tree swings, which were fun to relax in the shade on especially since it was an extremely hot and sunny day. There was some trash which is a problem with a lot of the beaches I’ve visited around this area of Thailand but they at least have workers picking it up and have signs put up that ask tourists not to litter.

I stopped at one more beach that was next to Ao Prao (not sure of the name of this one) but this beach had very soft, white sand so it was very beautiful as long as you kept your eyes open for broken glass around the entrance. Overall, it was definitely an enjoyable weekend getaway with gorgeous views!

Categories
thailand

Bang Sean- Chonburi

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picnic area 🙂

Our school had a 3-day weekend from July 8-10 due to the Buddhist holiday, Asalha Puja. It celebrates the Buddha delivering his first sermon. I decided to use this time to do a little traveling. I chose Bang Sean, a part of Chonburi, since it is only about an hour away from here and would be a lot less costly than some other destinations. It also has a beach, which was pretty much all I was looking for to relax near this weekend.

I soon found out this is not a very touristy area. I had to rely on the very little Thai that I knew at most restaurants and at the hostel but some of the servers at restaurants and bars did know a little English. It felt like a very Thai town but offered some different activities than Chachoengsao. It was perfect for me as a pescetarian because Bang Sean has a huge seafood market and the seafood is extremely fresh everywhere. They were even selling giant crabs and squid right along the beach.

The beach was nice enough but wasn’t as clear water as some of the places I’ve seen before in Thailand. The beach was also very narrow and crowded but it had a cool vibe with lots of groups of Thai people having picnics and lots of families relaxing and enjoying the holiday. Because of the holiday the whole weekend most bars were closed and 7/11’s were not selling alcohol. Of course, if there’s a will, there’s a way definitely applies here as people will discreetly sell beer on the street and we did manage to find one bar that was part of a hostel that was open.

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gorgeous beach!

I also visited the Burapha University aquarium at the Institute of Marine Science and received a discount since I finally completed my paperwork and now have a Thai work permit so that was a nice plus and saw some beautiful fish.

Categories
thailand

Bangkok Part II + III

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Part II:

This time around I took the train from Chachoengsao to Bangkok to attempt to bypass the traffic I’d inevitably run into on the highway on a Friday evening. The train was moving very…let’s say…leisurely but it’s very old so it most likely can’t run any faster. All the windows are left open with just a few ceiling fans to cool the passengers. It was fairly crowded but it only costs 13 baht so you can’t find anything cheaper. The view was pretty interesting since in between the cities is mostly rural area and some very poor living conditions.

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I had to then transfer to the BTS to get to the hostel. It was located near Silom road. I tried Thailand tacos at Sunrise Tacos. It was average and pretty pricey since you’re mostly paying for the comfort of the food and not the actual quality of it. However, they did have endless tortilla chips with about 8 different salsas.

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The next day I visited Siam Center, which is a huge mall with stores as upscale as Balenciaga and Dolce & Gabbana but also included more affordable options such as H&M and Uniqlo. It had 6 stories of shops so it was easy to spend the better part of a day inside especially when I found a bookstore with a big selection of English books!

Part III:

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This time around I stayed near Khao San Road, which I had read is very backpacker heavy. It turns out it is even more of a tourist trap than I had expected. It was very much a party area which is alright if that’s what you’re looking for but even so it was overcrowded, overpriced and overrated. It just so happens anyway that I am on a little break from drinking so this was truly the worst place to go during sober times.

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I don’t look very happy here but I am! I bought this cool shirt from a street vendor

I stayed on the street parallel to Khao San thinking it would be a bit more quiet like the reviews online suggested but instead ended up unwillingly staying up until about 4am due to bars blasting music and extremely thin hostel windows.

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As much as I love Thai food, I eat it everyday for every meal here in Chachoengsao so when I go to Bangkok I like to order things I can’t get where I live. I ate a Greek salad, which was delicious by all means but also triple the price I usually pay for a meal. The worst part about this was all the salesmen who would not stop pestering me while I’m trying to enjoy my meal. They continuously offered scorpions on a stick, handmade bracelets, fidget spinners and more while I tried to wave them away with a mouthful full of salad.

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The best part of the trip was actually breakfast because I found a place with American breakfast and it was really refreshing.

Categories
thailand

Khao Lak

The flight from Bangkok to Phuket was only ~ an hour + included a pretty view! IMG_6394Ban Bang Niang Beach was gorgeous and surprisingly not very crowded while we were there. Our hostel was perfect since it was around $7/night and included AC and wifi. There was breakfast every morning for 100 baht which included coffee/tea, fresh juice, fresh fruit, eggs and toast. Additionally, the owner, Parisia spoke English very well and was so sweet. She waits up for her guests to arrive even if its 3 in the morning and is very friendly.  When we had to leave she gave us all a hug and a kiss on the cheek and waved goodbye as our van drove away. So if you visit Khao Lak stay at Parisia Guesthouse!

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We got to swim in this pool which is at a beachside resort since they were just opening and wanted to appear like they have customers. We did eat at their cafe for lunch which was super westernized and overpriced but we were in a touristy area so that’s to be expected. The rest of our time there we stuck to Thai food and everything from curry to tom yum noodles was delicious. I almost never burn and even with SPF 45 and reapplying still managed to get some pretty red shoulders because the sun is so strong here in the south but I also got a pretty nice tan so it was worth sacrificing the shoulders.

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Khao Lak is amazing and definitely a place I would visit again. It’s good for a quick getaway  (we only stayed 5 days). It also wasn’t very crowded so we were able to truly vacation, enjoy life slow-paced and take in the beauty of Thailand.