Offbeat comedy “Frank” takes unsettling turn

 

“Frank” is an offbeat British comedy that follows a character based off of 80s musician Chris Sievey who donned a papier-mâché head and performed as “Frank Sidebottom.” Domhnall Gleeson plays Jon, a wannabe musician who seizes an opening for a keyboardist with Frank’s eccentric pop band The Soronprfbs. The original music is exceptionally memorable and only adds to the likability of the group.

Each band member has their own oddity which creates an entertaining dynamic within the group when they move into an isolated cabin to record an album. Frank, played by Michael Fassbender, is kind and charming while Maggie Gyllenhaal’s character, Clara, is extremely malicious to Jon throughout the film in a comedic manner. The other band members speak mostly amongst themselves in French. It succeeds in producing engaging dark comedy even through onscreen deaths and relationship turmoil.

Towards the end of the film however, it changes from a fun comedy into a dramatic film where suddenly our protagonist Jon is the villain and the trouble-making band members are the victims. After Jon posted videos of the band online looking for fame and helped Frank to find a more radio-friendly sound, it turns out he was only seeking glory for himself. His total destruction of the band comes at an unforgettably disastrous SXSW performance that would put Ashley Simpson’s infamous lip-syncing debacle to shame, ending with Frank’s panic attack.

Following Frank’s breakdown, the film continues to change in tone abruptly and drastically. Frank, the character that the audience has laughed at and been wonderfully confused by the whole film suddenly leaves us feeling melancholy, conflicted, and oddly guilty when it is revealed plainly that he is suffering from a mental illness.

The biggest flaw in “Frank” is the directorial decision to remove the title character’s head and reveal onscreen the man’s true features. It puts a face on the enigmatic anti-hero and brings him down to human status, which he seemed to ascend when he wore the mask. Previously, the audience had grown to love the quirky, kind and sincere character but once he is revealed we are forced to see him in a completely different light, as a mental health patient. It forces you to look back at scenes and re-evaluate them in an unpleasant and uneasy way. Frank goes from a colorful, wacky eccentric to a glum loner suffering from what appears to be a form of Autism. Nevertheless director Lenny Abrahamson succeeded in creating an outlandish and unique Indie film.

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Coming of Age Film “Boyhood” Claims Summer Spotlight

            The best movie released this summer was not big budget blockbusters like “Guardians of the Galaxy” or “Lucy” but a film that was over 12 years in the making. “Boyhood” directed by Richard Linklater portrays the life of a young boy, Mason, played by Ellar Coltrane, from ages 5 to 18. Throughout the film, viewers see the evolution of a family with Mason’s father played by Ethan Hawke, mother played by Patricia Arquette, and sister played by the director’s daughter, Lorelei Linklater.

Despite the big stars cast in the film, it often felt like watching someone else’s brilliantly shot home videos instead of a Hollywood movie because the moments are so life-like and genuine. Linklater proves himself once again to be a pioneer of the film industry. He previously demonstrating his prowess with films such as “Waking Life” and “A Scanner Darkly” in which he traced over live action scenes with colorful 3D animation, but “Boyhood” is without a doubt his masterpiece.

He has captured human life unlike any other movie in cinema history as the audience witnesses the literal transformation of one child’s journey to adulthood right before their eyes. The script omits exaggerated plot twists and tedious melodrama, opting instead for sincere person-to-person dialogue and narrative that just as easily could have been the boy’s actual experiences.

What is even more astounding was Linklater’s ability to continue making other feature length films over the lengthy filming period without interfering with this project. Linklater shot this film by gathering up the cast once every year for 12 years and would then shoot 3-4 days each time. That being said, it flows smoothly and Linklater manages to place the pieces together so realistically that Mason’s aging isn’t jarring.

The soundtrack ages in time with the film featuring many cultural references from the past. Viewers will be drawn back to the first time they heard the tracks including “Soak up the Sun” by Sheryl Crow, “Oops I Did It Again” by Britney Spears and “Crank That (Soulja Boy)” by Soulja Boy.

The film is 165 minutes long but doesn’t feel like it due to viewers’ unavoidable emotional investments in Mason. Audiences are bound to feel the nostalgia oozing off the screen regardless of age or gender because the film incorporates universal milestones of growing up while Ellar Coltrane literally grows up before our eyes on screen. As sentimental as it is, it portrays both the good, bad, and ugly parts of growing up without sugarcoating. Linklater effectively managed to create a relatable coming of age film that manages to avoid clichés and radiate authenticity.

‘Grand Budapest Hotel’ is Anderson’s Best Film Yet

Wes Anderson’s new film The Grand Budapest Hotel trails the adventures of Gustave H. and Zero Moustafa, a concierge and a lobby boy, respectively at a famous European hotel. The backdrop of the story is the 1930s with the hotel located between fictional countries at war, reminiscent of Nazi Germany’s overtaking of Europe.

The plot revolves around a priceless Renaissance painting titled “Boy with Apple” and a great family inheritance. When the sole proprietor of the aforementioned riches is murdered, the movie follows the protagonists’ escpades in a tale of whodunit. The story, based on writings from Austrian novelist, Stefan Zweig, works well as a frame narrative with an older Zero Moustafa retelling his life’s story to a young writer played by Jude Law. It breaks through genre barriers including elements of an adventure film and a comedy with moments of gravity.

Anderson incites the help of several familiar faces to round out his cast.  Bill Murray, Owen Wilson, Jason Schwartzman, Adrien Brody, Tilda Swinton, and Willem Dafoe, all usual suspects in Anderson’s films, reappear, some for rather short cameos, as quirky and signature characters brought to life by the inventive director.

Ralph Fiennes as Gustave shows impeccable timing in his delivery of lines producing genuine laughs and exceptional entertainment. Tony Revolori, as younger Zero and Gustave’s protégé, complements Gustave’s whimsical personality with his serious demeanor. As the story develops, so does a romance between Zero and Agatha, another hotel employee played by Saoirse Ronan. Due to a large amount of foreshadowing and voiceovers by older Zero telling the story, the audience already had an idea of how the relationship would come to an end.

Almost immediately viewers are captured through Anderson’s gorgeous, brilliant color schemes and meticulously designed sets. The hotel unfortunately does not actually exist but was based off of several luxury hotels in Europe. The exterior shots were done using a miniature model while the interior shots were filmed in an abandoned department store in Germany.

The soundtrack stood out as typical Anderson in some ways but entirely new in others. It features original music by Alexandre Desplat, who also worked on Moonrise Kingdom and Fantastic Mr. Fox with Anderson. The harpsichord on “Concerto for Lute and Plucked Strings I. Moderato” is reminiscent of several other Anderson films but a few songs that differ would include “Last Will and Testament” featuring church organs and “Up the Stairs / Down the Hall,” which sounds like something you’d hear when opening a music box.

Overall, Grand Budapest Hotel is quintessential Anderson in that the visual elements are oozing nostalgia while oddball characters banter and bicker to create an entertaining and imaginative world that seems to come straight from Anderson’s mind. However, it is not typical for his tales to carry a serious undertone as this film skillfully does and that is what makes it Anderson’s best film yet.