‘Nightcrawler’ challenges future of journalistic integrity


It is said that credibility is a journalist’s greatest asset. However, an exception can be made for network news stations.

“Nightcrawler,” directed by Dan Gilroy, is a film that explores the world of freelance crime journalism. The main character Lou Bloom, played by Jake Gyllenhaal, draws the audience into his intelligent, devious mind from the start.

At the beginning of the film, Bloom seems lost in life. He steals and sells scrap metal and lives in a small apartment where he spends most of his time on his computer or watching television news. Then randomly, after a chance encounter on his drive home, he decides to learn the ropes of crime journalism.

After selling his first piece of footage to a TV news station, KWLA, Bloom becomes increasingly confident and ambitious and uses his knowledge of business and negotiation skills to rise up in the company. Bloom, when employers or authority are present, speaks very charismatically and infiltrates KWLA by manipulating Nina, KWLA’s news director.
He admits to Nina he did not receive much formal education, but finds most of his information online. Bloom’s existence in today’s highly connected world contrasts his detached and callous personality. He’s all business and no casual: the type of guy who could research comedians’ jokes all day but not know to laugh when they tell the punch line.

From this point on, Bloom begins to blur the lines between witnessing and participating. He forms his own company, Video Production News and continues to provoke questions about journalism ethics. By the end of the film, he is no longer an underdog in a big business but a daring mastermind in a business he’s gained much control over.
Even when Bloom blatantly violates ethical codes of journalism, there is something oddly likeable about him. He receives sympathy due to his social awkwardness, which makes him appear lonely looking for a human interaction and his clear passion for news reporting. However, Bloom’s surface insecurities are nothing more than a ploy to expose and take advantage of others’ weaknesses.

The film’s score works to add a satirically humorous tone at times which helps create a feeling of unease. One cannot help but crack a nervous smile when music suitable for a daytime soap opera is cued up over Bloom’s thoughtless final words to a dying colleague.
Overall, the film, in particular the ending, presents a cynical view of present day media as well as a negative forecast for the future of media where journalists completely forget morality and are in constant conflict with the police.

Bloom’s ominous last words, “I wouldn’t ask you to do anything I wouldn’t do myself” to his newly hired staff, foreshadows a vicious cycle as a new crop of corrupted and amoral journalists are birthed.

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