Coming of Age Film “Boyhood” Claims Summer Spotlight

            The best movie released this summer was not big budget blockbusters like “Guardians of the Galaxy” or “Lucy” but a film that was over 12 years in the making. “Boyhood” directed by Richard Linklater portrays the life of a young boy, Mason, played by Ellar Coltrane, from ages 5 to 18. Throughout the film, viewers see the evolution of a family with Mason’s father played by Ethan Hawke, mother played by Patricia Arquette, and sister played by the director’s daughter, Lorelei Linklater.

Despite the big stars cast in the film, it often felt like watching someone else’s brilliantly shot home videos instead of a Hollywood movie because the moments are so life-like and genuine. Linklater proves himself once again to be a pioneer of the film industry. He previously demonstrating his prowess with films such as “Waking Life” and “A Scanner Darkly” in which he traced over live action scenes with colorful 3D animation, but “Boyhood” is without a doubt his masterpiece.

He has captured human life unlike any other movie in cinema history as the audience witnesses the literal transformation of one child’s journey to adulthood right before their eyes. The script omits exaggerated plot twists and tedious melodrama, opting instead for sincere person-to-person dialogue and narrative that just as easily could have been the boy’s actual experiences.

What is even more astounding was Linklater’s ability to continue making other feature length films over the lengthy filming period without interfering with this project. Linklater shot this film by gathering up the cast once every year for 12 years and would then shoot 3-4 days each time. That being said, it flows smoothly and Linklater manages to place the pieces together so realistically that Mason’s aging isn’t jarring.

The soundtrack ages in time with the film featuring many cultural references from the past. Viewers will be drawn back to the first time they heard the tracks including “Soak up the Sun” by Sheryl Crow, “Oops I Did It Again” by Britney Spears and “Crank That (Soulja Boy)” by Soulja Boy.

The film is 165 minutes long but doesn’t feel like it due to viewers’ unavoidable emotional investments in Mason. Audiences are bound to feel the nostalgia oozing off the screen regardless of age or gender because the film incorporates universal milestones of growing up while Ellar Coltrane literally grows up before our eyes on screen. As sentimental as it is, it portrays both the good, bad, and ugly parts of growing up without sugarcoating. Linklater effectively managed to create a relatable coming of age film that manages to avoid clichés and radiate authenticity.

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